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Heather Nortz

Heather Nortz, Government and Business Affairs Assistant, SGIA, a George Mason University graduate. As an accelerated master’s student in Energy and Sustainability, she simultaneously earned her bachelor's degree in Environmental Science with a concentration in Human and Ecosystems Response to Climate Change.

Recent Posts

The Whole Safety Package

Posted by Heather Nortz on 9/30/19 6:59 AM

Newly available from SGIA’s Government Affairs team is the Walking Working Surfaces (WWS) Safety Package. This collection of resources is a comprehensive compliance resource that builds on our Ladder Safety Package. The recent addition of a rule overview booklet, two more posters and five checklists completes the package to be a one-stop shop for your WWS compliance needs. Here's what the package specifically includes.

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Topics: Printing Industry, OSHA, Workplace Safety, Safety Recognition

Hungry for Sustainability

Posted by Heather Nortz on 8/26/19 7:00 AM

In preparation for the eagerly awaited conversations to come during PRINTING United’s Sustainability Strategies Luncheon: Inside and Out on October 23, I reached out to two of our speakers to hear their insights on the world of sustainable print today and what they project for the future. Dale Crownover, the CEO of Texas Nameplate Company, and Brett Thompson, the Sign and Graphic Market Manager of Piedmont Plastics joined me in discussing how they define sustainable print, the generational gap with “green” vocabulary and more.

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Topics: Printing Industry, Sustainability, Printing United

The Sustainable Packaging Loop

Posted by Heather Nortz on 8/5/19 7:05 AM

What is one thing online shopping and takeout food have in common? Packaging. The convenience of clothes, furniture or whatever your heart’s desire being delivered to your door comes with the cost of the protective layer wrapped around it. We have cast aside this foam peanut-filled cardboard or plastic time and time again — into the garbage bin it goes, to be forgotten while the long-awaited prize inside is revealed and gazed at. Gone are the days of the milkman when the package was valued — carefully emptied and returned to its original sender to be refilled again — or are they?

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Topics: Packaging, Printed Packaging, Sustainability, Business Operations